Friday
Jul112014

Update on the Mission Lazarus Education Center Construction. By Kurt Dehut, Director of Logistics

If I were to tell you that schools in Haiti are viewed different than the schools in the US, you wouldn't be surprised would you? 
What may surprise you is all the reasons why schools are viewed differently. 
The first and most obvious reason is that in the US, you assume a child will go to school.
In Haiti, there is no such assumption. Sending your child to school is a luxury. 
No one will argue that there's a need for education in the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. 
But what about other needs? 
Clothes? 
Food? 
What if a school could address all those needs? 
The Mission Lazarus Education Center (MLEC) in Haiti, currently under construction will provide quality education. The education at the MLEC will be at a level that I would want to send my child to (if I had kids). 
Our goal is to empower a community by laying the proper educational foundation in their youngest generation.  Not only will the children receive a quality education, but similar to our Early Development centers in Honduras, the MLEC will provide schoolchildren with two quality meals
a day. 
Now imagine this scenario: you are a single mother struggling to take care of 4 or 5 kids. You have the option to abandon one of your children and know the a children's refuge will take your child in and take care of him or her. Your financial burden becomes smaller, and your child would "survive".
But what if you had the opportunity to send your child to the MLEC where she will be fed two quality meals a day while receiving a quality education. Which would you choose?  A feeding program combined with education relieves a large portion of the burden mothers face in raising their children on their own.
Our goal is to keep families together, keep communities together, and discourage child abandonment.
 
The MLEC will also provide the schoolchildren with school uniforms and school supplies.
It is a common practice for Haitian schools to provide these materials to their schoolchildren because their families could not afford them otherwise. The children take great pride in these uniforms and supplies because they know not every child has the same opportunity.  
Not only does the child have clothes on their back and the tools necessary for learning, but dignity allows children to dream. To be empowered. To take that next step out of poverty for their families and their communities. It's a matter of dignity. 
Our goal is to empower children. By giving them the proper tools to learn, uniforms that they feel worthy and dignified wearing we hope to let them know and believe that they are made in the image of God. They are children of the King. 

Several teams have gone to Haiti to help with the construction of the school.  There is more to be done, but there is progress. Here's some the most recent pictures of the construction:
If you missed our picture from our trips to build the school in May here's a few more pictures:
We are still looking to fund more areas of the school.  If you would like to partner with us and donate, click on the links below. If you are interested in going on a trip to Haiti please email: info@missionlazarus.org

 

KD. 

Friday
Sep062013

Update from Jarrod in Haiti!

70 square feet with walls made of blue tarps. I can’t imagine living by myself in this “house” in the tropics, in the direct line of seemingly every hurricane that finds its way into the Caribbean, much less to live in 70 square feet with 8 other people. How is that possible. I sometimes feel a bit self righteous that I live in a small old farm house of only about 1000 feet. But even my ls farm house can sometimes seem too small for our family of four. It would appear that for many in the US that we’ve done such a great job at being successful and enjoying the fruits of our success that it would appear hard to fathom that heaven really could be any better than our current situation. For the developing world, in particular Haiti, there is no doubt that life on this earth “n’est pas bon chose”.  I do not want to live in 70 square feet with my family, but not do I want anyone else to have to do it either. The situation in Haiti will not be undone, not even by the seemingly endless supply of NGO’s (non-profits) working there. Haiti is the epitome of what happens when educated people with money and without morals exploit an African people. The struggles in Haiti, even the ones that seem to be home grown are not, they are the product of yet again “the western world” before the western world knew that it could influence the world for good or for bad. The fact that I can step off of a plane in Port au Prince and be welcomed is a true testament to the amazing hearts and grace that the people of Haiti offer to all who visit, but think twice before you slight them respect, they are a great nation who inspite of their struggles and limitations has overcome overwhelming odds to even exist, starting with their revolution against Napoleon control in the 1800’s. I pray that nothing that Mission Lazarus does in Haiti feeds a resentment of the US but that we indeed are intentional, respectful always of local culture and pride, and that we always recognize how much God has been doing here for many years and that we are now merely another tool that He has at his disposal. If you’d like to provide housing to another family living in deplorable conditions we can make that happen, $5000 will put them in a great home that will last for generations.   *note this was typed with my thumbs on an IPhone and has not been proofed for grammatical nor spelling errors.

 

70 square feet with walls made of blue tarps. I can’t imagine living by myself in this “house” in the tropics, in the direct line of seemingly every hurricane that finds its way into the Caribbean, much less to live in 70 square feet with 8 other people. How is that possible. I sometimes feel a bit self righteous that I live in a small old farm house of only about 1000 feet. But even my ls farm house can sometimes seem too small for our family of four. It would appear that for many in the US that we’ve done such a great job at being successful and enjoying the fruits of our success that it would appear hard to fathom that heaven really could be any better than our current situation. For the developing world, in particular Haiti, there is no doubt that life on this earth “n’est pas bon chose”. I do not want to live in 70 square feet with my family, but not do I want anyone else to have to do it either. The situation in Haiti will not be undone, not even by the seemingly endless supply of NGO’s (non-profits) working there. Haiti is the epitome of what happens when educated people with money and without morals exploit an African people. The struggles in Haiti, even the ones that seem to be home grown are not, they are the product of yet again “the western world” before the western world knew that it could influence the world for good or for bad. The fact that I can step off of a plane in Port au Prince and be welcomed is a true testament to the amazing hearts and grace that the people of Haiti offer to all who visit, but think twice before you slight them respect, they are a great nation who inspite of their struggles and limitations has overcome overwhelming odds to even exist, starting with their revolution against Napoleon control in the 1800’s. I pray that nothing that Mission Lazarus does in Haiti feeds a resentment of the US but that we indeed are intentional, respectful always of local culture and pride, and that we always recognize how much God has been doing here for many years and that we are now merely another tool that He has at his disposal. If you’d like to provide housing to another family living in deplorable conditions we can make that happen, $5000 will put them in a great home that will last for generations.

*note this was typed with my thumbs on an IPhone and has not been proofed for grammatical nor spelling errors.

Tuesday
Jun252013

I Need what They Have

It usually takes a few days in a new culture to begin to process your new surroundings. These sensory impulses can take on the rhythmical cadence of a heartbeat or the ebb and flow of an ocean wave. These impulses are a continual reminder that you're no longer at home; yet, you are somehow welcoming this strange new place into your comfort zone.

This is in no way saying you accept this new world as "home". However, you can no longer allow yourself to dismiss the new culture as a place that doesn't exist – a place you simply fly over or through en route to a destination.

I'm seeing this metamorphosis occur within an amazing group of volunteers I've brought to Haiti this week. Team HHYG! It's a team of eight teens and eight adults from Nashville plus three Spirit-filled Haitian translators and our ever vigilant bus driver.

Last night one team member said it best when she said that she came here to try to give these people some of what we have in the States but she now realized she needed more of what they have.

This tender hearted Follower is allowing Spirit to transform her. She is realizing that possessions, "stuff", is not the answer. The entire team is seeing that though these people have very few material possessions and practically no modern conveniences they are happy. Why? Because they have found contentment in God. The peace that Jesus promises in John 14:27 –
"My peace is the legacy I leave to you. I don’t give gifts like those of this world. Do not let your heart be troubled or fearful."

We are beginning our third day of offering VBS to children in Haiti. We started in the Canaan 3 "tent city" of Port-au-Prince then taught children in Gonaïves. This morning we begin with the smiling faces of Cap Haitian and in the afternoon those of Dumas.

We are giving small trinkets: a foam crown, sunglasses, crayons, a photo of themselves and other symbolic teaching aids. We're providing a utilitarian gift of flip flops to children – some of these children have no shoes. We're telling the story of Jesus' triumphal entry using visual aids created by a sweet servant of God from Oregon. We're singing songs. Even though these children have never had most of the things were giving them were doing something much more important than any I this. We're putting smiles on their faces by showing them the love of Jesus.

Jesus has been working here long before we arrived and He will be here long after we leave. He has been everywhere since before creation.

We're blessed that He invited into His ministry of nourishing the seeds growing in hearts of these precious people.

We're blessed because Jesus is gently breaking our hearts; transforming us and molding us. Prayerfully, we are looking more like Him than we did in Nashville.

ljm

Sunday
Jun162013

How Healthy is Your Jesus?

I've been blessed to travel to more than 20 countries around the world, often to assist the locals with Christian efforts.

As I visit museums, gift shops and street markets I regularly see artwork that depicts Jesus Christ. Paintings, carvings, sculpture, tapestry – Jesus is prominently displayed. One theme seems to ring true. Jesus is almost always depicted as reflecting the people of each culture.

This is actually a very comforting thought. Each one of us who has chosen to follow Jesus should have such a close relationship with Him that we see Him as being one of us.

As an example, I've seen images of Jesus with every skin tone from pale pink to ebony.

During a recent visit to Haiti I saw a craving of Jesus that represented an under nourished Jesus. He was so thin each of his ribs were protruding from his torso.

Do you see Jesus as looking like you? Do I?

Let's pray we all see Jesus as an intimate friend.

Larry Musick


Wednesday
Jun122013

"Today I Saw What Blessed Looks Like"

"Today I Saw What Blessed Looks Like"

During one of our evening devotionals one of the members of the Cross Point team shared this beautiful quote.

Here's the context in which she said it: We live with so much in America and often take for granted what true blessing looks like.

We sometimes hash tag a post with #blessings when we are going on a cool date or enjoying a beautiful night. These are blessings.

However, today we saw people that smile and laugh in the midst if literally nothing; true poverty beyond what we see in the USA. True blessing is that joy and pace that only God can give and the Haitian people have that. this is the only blessing to live in.

In Haiti we see blessed people everywhere!